THE MOST EVIDENCE-BASED WAYS TO CONTROL ACNE THROUGH YOUR DIET

The following are the most evidence-based ways to control acne through your diet.

Acne, especially adult acne, is often referred to as hormonal acne. Hormones, along with many other factors, including bacteria, skin cell abnormalities, genetics, and stress levels, play a role in its progression. Though the condition is typically treated with medication, lifestyle factors, including your diet, can play a powerful role in controlling and reducing symptoms.

The following are the most evidence-based ways to control acne through your diet.

Drink more water

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Drink more water- google image 

After all, your body is 60 percent water, so it’s no surprise you need to drink enough water to optimize physical processes. Drinking water is also key to consuming the correct amount of daily calories – often we mistake hunger for thirst, so when in doubt drink water first. Water is the foundation of healthy, clear skin so aim for 8 glasses of water every day.

Cut back on sugar

Sugar is decidedly not a part of any acne diet. Unfortunately, it’s in just about everything we eat, all day long, making it difficult to avoid. Keep your daily sugar intake within the recommended two to four servings of the fructose found in fruit, and avoid sugars found elsewhere, like in refined carbohydrates and candy aisle sweets. Sugar, particularly from certain sources, can exacerbate acne – and cause a whole host of other health problems.

Ditch dairy (but keep Greek yogurt)

Dairy is high in sugar content (yes, lactose is also a sugar, just like glucose and fructose). Specifically, though, dairy consumption has been linked to increased acne. Although dairy is high in nutrients our bodies love – like calcium and protein – food from animals may not be the ideal source of protein, as study after study has linked animal-based proteins to higher incidents of cancer.

The science isn’t totally conclusive, so you don’t have to swear off meat and cheese forever, but certainly doctors now agree that decreasing your intake of animal proteins in favor of more vegetables is a good idea, for your skin and otherwise.

You don’t have to strike dairy from your list altogether: try a sugar-free (or as close to sugar-free as possible) Greek yogurt as a source of calcium, protein and probiotics.

  1. Foods and beverages to enjoy
  • Vegetables: broccoli, spinach, kale, peppers, zucchini, cauliflower, carrots, beets, etc.
  • Fruit: berries, grapefruit, oranges, apples, cherries, bananas, pears, grapes, peaches, etc.
  • Whole grains and starchy vegetables: Sweet potato, quinoa, butternut squash, farro, brown rice, oats, buckwheat, etc.
  • Healthy fats: whole eggs, olive oil, avocados, nuts, seeds, nut butters, coconut oil, etc.
  • Plant-based dairy alternatives: cashew milk, almond milk, coconut milk, coconut yogurt, etc.
  • High-quality protein: salmon, tofu, chicken, turkey, eggs, shellfish, etc.
  • Legumes: chickpeas, black beans, lentils, kidney beans, etc.
  • Anti-inflammatory herbs and spices: turmeric, cinnamon, black pepper, parsley, garlic, ginger, cayenne, etc.
  • Unsweetened beverages: water, sparkling water, green tea, hibiscus tea, lemon water, etc.

Along with traditional acne treatments, such as medications, diet can be used as an alternative, natural way to help control this condition. Following a nutrient-dense diet, cutting out dairy, and limiting added sugars are evidence-based practices that may improve acne symptoms.

Source: Healthline, Foreo

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