HOW WE CAN REDUCE OUR SALT INTAKE

When it comes to dietary sodium, less is certainly best, yet Americans today consume 50% more than the recommended daily quantities of sodium. Diets high in sodium increase blood pressure levels. High blood pressure damages the kidneys over time, and is a leading cause of kidney failure. So, how we can reduce our salt intake across all ages.

1.Salt in your diet

Much of the sodium we eat is hidden, with as much as 75% coming from processed and packaged foods. The salt you add during cooking and at the table isn’t the main problem as it only provides about 15% of the sodium we eat. The remaining 10% is in fresh fruit and vegetables, milk, fresh fish, chicken, meat and eggs.

The problem with too much salt

It’s the sodium in salt that can be bad for your health. Too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney failure. It can also cause ankle swelling and excessive fluid in the body in some people.

Your sodium needs

You shouldn’t have more than 2300 mg of sodium per day. That’s 6 g salt – just over a teaspoon of fine salt. For good health, you only need 460 to 920 mg of sodium a day – less than half a teaspoon of fine salt.

ĐÂY LÀ CÁCH ĐỂ LOẠI BỎ NATRI THỪA TRONG CƠ THỂ MỘT CÁCH AN TOÀN

You shouldn’t have more than 2300 mg of sodium per day- google image 

2.How we can reduce our salt intake

1.  Use fresh, rather than packaged, meats. Fresh cuts of beef, chicken or pork contain natural sodium, but the content is still much less than the hidden extra sodium added during processing in products like bacon or ham. If a food item keeps well in the fridge for days or weeks, that’s a tip off that the sodium content is too high.

2.  Choose fresh fruit and vegetables, as well, since they are very low in sodium. Canned and frozen fruits are also low in sodium.

3.  When buying frozen vegetables, choose those that are labeled “fresh frozen” and do not contain added seasoning or sauces.

4.  Begin reading food labels as a matter of course. Sodium content is always listed on the label. Sometimes the high sugar content in a product like apple pie can mask the high sodium content so it’s important to check every label for sodium content.

ĐIỀU TRỊ MỤN BẰNG BỘT SẮN DÂY

Begin reading food labels as a matter of course – google image

5.  Compare various brands of the same food item until you find the one that has the lowest sodium content, since this will vary from brand to brand.

6.  Take salt and salty sauces off the table so younger family members won’t develop the habit of adding salt. Tastes and eating habits are formed early by children. If a child is exposed to salty foods when they are young, it is more likely that they will have a preference for salty foods when they are adults. If your family regularly uses table salt and salty sauces, removing them from the table will help to reduce your reliance on using sauces to add flavour to meals.

7.  Beware of products that don’t taste especially salty but still have high sodium content, such as cottage cheese.

8.  Try using ground pepper, lemon juice, vinegar, fresh garlic, ginger, mustard, chilli or other herbs and spices to flavour your food.

Source: kidney, heartfoundation, healthinfo

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